Mining Pyrite - curated group exhibition at Sydney Olympic Park

Parramatta River, Newington Armory Sydney

Mining Pyrite features the artworks of:

Wade Marynowsky, Mark Booth, Chris Bowman, Mark Brown, Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, Louisa Dawson, Gary Deirmendjian, Judith Duquemin, Allan Giddy, John Gillies, Locust Jones, Akira Kamada, Michael Keighery, Daniel Mudie Cunningham, Meredith Peach, Jane Theau, Rachel Walls, Ken and Julia Yonetani.

Mining Pyrite is a NEW exhibition to be displayed for FREE at Newington Armory Gallery at Sydney Olympic Park, from 10am-4pm every weekend from Saturday 17 June – Sunday 20 August 2017 (inclusive).

Curated by Cassandra Hard-Lawrie and Nick Vickers, Mining Pyrite will feature the works of 20 international and local contemporary artists, each of whom have drawn inspiration from Sydney Olympic Park and used its facilities to create their artworks. The diverse exhibition spans a broad range of expressive media forms including installation, sculpture, photography, multimedia, video, painting and more.

Gaining its title from the mineral ‘pyrite’, or ‘Fools Gold’, Mining Pyrite explores the parallel narrative of failure and success that can be drawn from the ‘artist's’ story.

Curator Nick Vickers draws comparison between the development of Sydney Olympic Park and that of the artist’s journey. “The constant testing and exploration of the boundaries of what does and doesn’t work is the stock and trade of creativity," explains Vickers.

During the past 12 years, Sydney Olympic Park Authority has supported more than 170 artists' journeys of exploration by providing its artists-in-residence program. The program allows artists to take inspiration on-site of the historic, heritage-listed Newington Armory precinct, via its unique studio spaces available for rent to artists.

Mining Pyrite features the works of artists who have occupied the studios at Newington Armory and whose works exemplify a journey of exploration and experimentation. The Mining Pyrite exhibition sheds light on the activities of the studios at Newington Armory, while celebrating the success of the Park's artists-in-residence program and the history of Sydney Olympic Park as a whole.

The area that is Sydney Olympic Park today has experienced many instances of failure and success. From the closure of its State Abattoir in 1988 and the Brickworks closure thereafter, the area was then considered economically unviable. The Park hosted numerous unsuccessful coal mining attempts and was once a wasteland. Today however, Sydney Olympic Park is recognised as an internationally admired example of sustainable urban renewal and development. The Park is home to a growing residential area with a thriving corporate business district and a spectacular entertainment precinct.

Featured artist Wade Marynowsky specialises in immersive, interactive and experimental art forms. Mining Pyrite will include his work Black Casino, which involves five flying V guitars mounted atop a rotating spin wheel, his boundary-pushing style acts as a fitting parallel to Sydney Olympic Park’s own progressive journey.

“The arts community of Western Sydney is second to none and the ‘Mining Pyrite’ exhibition at the Armory Gallery provides a great opportunity to see a sample of some of the region’s best artistic works,” said Minister for Western Sydney, Stuart Ayres. “I recommend people get along to Sydney Olympic Park’s Armory Gallery and enjoy exploring this unique arts space”.

Mining Pyrite features the artworks of: Wade Marynowsky, Mark Booth, Chris Bowman, Mark Brown, Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro, Louisa Dawson, Gary Deirmendjian, Judith Duquemin, Allan Giddy, John Gillies, Locust Jones, Akira Kamada, Michael Keighery, Daniel Mudie Cunningham, Meredith Peach, Jane Theau, Rachel Walls, Ken and Julia Yonetani.

With nearby FREE car parking at Blaxland Riverside Park, the Armory Gallery is located at Building 18 at Newington Armory, accessible via Jamieson St at Sydney Olympic Park.

For more information, visit sydneyolympicpark.com.au/arts. Also, check-out Sydney Olympic Park’s YouTube Channel, follow @olympicpark_syd on Twitter and @SydOlympicPark on Instagram or visit the Sydney Olympic Park page on Facebook.

ABOUT NEWINGTON ARMORY AT SYDNEY OLYMPIC PARK:
Newington Armory – formerly the Royal Australian Naval Armament Depot (RANAD) – is an exciting arts and culture hub with a choice of multi-purpose venues for all members of the community. Featuring unique and spacious facilities for artists and art enthusiasts alike, the heritage-listed Newington Armory includes the Armory Gallery, a theatre and an amphitheatre, making it an important venue for Sydney's arts community. Newington Armory is located within Sydney Olympic Park. sydneyolympicpark.com.au

FREE Art Exhibition: Mining Pyrite

* When: Every weekend from Saturday 17 June – Sunday 20 August 2017, 10am – 4pm.

* Where: Newington Armory Gallery (Building 18) Newington Armory,
Access via Jamieson St at Sydney Olympic Park

* Info: www.sydneyolympicpark.com.au/arts

FOR ALL MEDIA ENQUIRIES INCLUDING IMAGES AND INTERVIEW OPPORTUNITIES, PLEASE CONTACT: 
Tori McPherson or Susan Darwiche of Verve T: 02-8004-2462 M: 0414-706-704 E: torim@vervepr.com.au

Group Exhibition Bulgaria

 

orthogonal16. 
4 may – 4 june, 2017 
nonsofia/the red house centre for culture and debate 
sofia, bulgaria 

http://www.nonsofia.org/

curated by georgi dimitrov

http://orthogonal.bg/en/16/judith-duquemin/

https://twitter.com/nonsofia/status/858426805056917505

 

travelling to contemporary space, varna, bulgaria

http://www.contemporaryspace.bg/en/

participating artists

 

1. dr ingo glass, de/ro de.wikipedia.org/wiki/ingo_glass
2. dr nortrud gomringer, de kunsthaus-rehau.de
3. esther hagenmaier, de esther-hagenmaier.com
4. gisela hoffmann, de hoffmann-gisela.com
5. patrick morrissey, uk patrickmorrisseyhanz.co.uk/morrissey_works2.html
6. hanz hancock, uk patrickmorrisseyhanz.co.uk/hanz_works%202.html
7. prof. eugen gomringer, ch de.wikipedia.org/wiki/eugen_gomringer
8. erdem küçükköroğlu, tr geometrivesanat.com
9. dr nikolay petkov, bg national academy of arts, sofia
10. † petar dochev, bg sghg.bg/en/?page=izbrana_izlojba&exhibition=2009.09.14-2009.10.11
11. † ivan shumanov, bg nonsofia.org/2010/08/ivan-shumanov-1961-1993-never-shown.html
12. georgi dimitrov, bg larypsed.com 
13. dr judith duquemin uk/au  www.judithduquemin.com
 
 
 

Artist Statement: Judith Duquemin
Exhibition: Orthogonal 16 03 May - 03 June 2017
Curated by: Georgi Dimitrov of nonsofia
Red House Centre for Culture and Debate
Sofia, Bulgaria
The use of geometric code in painting can manifest in a variety of ways. The two works presented for Orthogonal16 are a digital loop animation, and a 40 cm. acrylic canvas painting on a customized round stretcher.
ATCG Reproductions (2007) is a diffusion of superimposed human DNA code that produces subtle primary, secondary and tertiary additive colour shifts. The eleven digitally programmed variations of DNA protein (Adenine, Guanine, Cytosine and Thymine) are reconstructed rectangular, hardedge paintings of red, green, blue and yellow vertical and horizontal stripes that meet randomly on a staged diagonal.
Mondrian for Space Travellers (2017) is a round, multi-dimensional, tessellation that appropriates a Mondrian palette of red, blue, yellow, white and black. Unlike Mondrian’s flat grid paintings it employs a mathematically coded, irregular grid that eliminates the notion of horizon (horizontal) and it’s human gravitational counterpart (vertical).
Each work supports a self-organising, non-objective approach to asymmetric pictorial composition through the use of creatively researched geometric code. Each are an example of the artist’s non-stylized, experimental approach to contemporary abstract painting.
© Judith Duquemin 2017

Commissioned Work

Campus UNSW

 

 

Recent review

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/Bridget_Riley.html

Bridget Riley: The Curve Paintings 1961 – 2014. De La Warr Pavilion, June 13 to September 16, 2015

Review by Judith Duquemin

" Memorable about visiting the exhibition: “Bridget Riley: The Curve Paintings 1961 – 2014”, at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill on Sea, was its venue and location, as the theme and composition of the exhibition were complemented by the streamlined Art Deco architecture of the pavilion and its close proximity to the sea.

 

De la Warr Pavilion. Photo by Judith Duquemin

I was fortunate to have viewed this exhibition on a temperate, sunny, cloudless, summer’s day, in full view of the sea and the adjacent coastline. The occasion amounted to a visual feast of natural and constructed curvilinear colour and light sensations, in and beyond the gallery. Reminiscent of Riley’s childhood experiences of growing up in the natural beauty of the Cornish countryside, I imagine this is how she would like it..."

Recent exhibition

Sluice Art Fair. London 2015

Saturation Point at Sluice Art Fair. London 2015

Judith Duquemin | Hanz Hancock | Patrick Morrissey | Laurence Noga | Andy Parkinson | Charley Peters

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/Clear_Sight.html

Recent interview

British artist Cedric Christie, at Flowers Gallery, London. 

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/Cedric_Christie.html

 

Recent Group Exhibition, London

http://slateprojects.com/exhibitions

"From Centre" curated by Alex Mercier, Slate Projects and Saturation Point. London

 FROM CENTRE

 Private View: 12-6pm, Saturday 11 April, 2015

 Exhibition dates: 11 April – 26 April, open Thu-Sun 12-6pm, and by appointment

The Loud & Western Building, 65 Broughton Road, SW6 2LE

 Nearest Tube Station: Imperial Wharf

Sometimes I dream of a work of really great breadth, ranging through the whole region of element, object, meaning and style.This I fear, will remain a dream, but is a good thing even now to bear the possibility occasionally in mind. Nothing can be rushed. It must grow, it should grow of itself, and if the time ever comes for that work - then so much the better!

Paul Klee, On Modern Art, 1948

From Centre, curated by Slate Projects and Saturation Point Projects, is a group exhibition which surveys contemporary approaches to reductive geometric painting, drawing and sculpture. Spanning several generations of artists, born in every decade from the 1930s to the 1980s, From Centre makes the case for the growing relevance of abstract art in the UK. Curated over three floors in a converted laundry factory, the works exhibited expand on the notions of architectural space, surface play, systematic painting, and sense of place.

 

Saturation Point is an online editorial and curatorial project for reductive, geometric and systems artists working in the UK

List of artists:

William Angus-Hughes, Rana Begum, Martin Church, Nathan Cohen, Rhys Coren, Natalie Dower, Judith Duquemin, Julia Farrer, Ben Gooding, Lothar Götz, Hanz Hancock, Tess Jaray, Silvia Lerin, Peter Lowe, Patrick Morrissey, Laurence Noga, Charley Peters, Richard Plank, Giulia Ricci, Carol Robertson, Robin Seir, Steve Sproates, Trevor Sutton

 

From the Edwardian period to the 1990s, the Loud & Western Building was home to one of London's largest commercial laundry operations, Sunlight Laundry. During the Blitz, the building served as a volunteer sand bagging centre. Today, the Loud & Western is in the process of being converted into a residential apartments.

 

An illustrated catalogue with essays by Nathan Cohen, Laura Davidson and Alex Meurice will accompany the exhibition.

 

 

 

 

Documentary. France

Lignes et Paysages, screening June 13/15 Channel 3, France

Includes an interview with Judith Duquemin by Francesca Partridge and Frank Dubuc, 60 Degrees Productions, Perpignan.

Review

. Painters Table: Interview: Judith Duquemin

http://painters-table.com/link/saturation-point/judith-duquemin-interview

 

Judith Duquemin, Rhombic manipulation, acrylic on board, 20.3 x 25.4 cm, 2014 (©
Judith Duquemin, Rhombic manipulation, acrylic on
board,
20.3 x 25.4 cm, 2014 (© Judith Duquemin 2014, courtesy of the artist)

 

Charley Peters interviews artist Judith Duquemin about her work.

 

Duquemin comments: "Whether it be analogue or conceptual reality, or abstract conceptual reality, sometimes referred to as virtual reality, we require a personal history of perceptual experience to respond to what we sense and perceive, and this can be applied to all notions of reality, with each appealing to perception in different ways. While I acknowledge that the materiality and sensuality of painting, and the value of hand/eye/brain synchronicity, can produce convincing analogies of reality as a perceptual experience, I favour a definition of conceptual reality, an experience of reality characterized by abstract ideas and concepts. By referring to the very notion of individual free will, it could be argued that reality is more conceptual by nature. And I would fall short of saying that virtual reality can never inherit the analogue perspective of painting, simply because we do not know the potential of digital media, and also because as a human race we are adapting all the time to digital communications that require new levels of psychomotor interactivity ... I like to mix painting with the digital processes of image making, researching their potential in as many ways as possible... It could be said that I prefer a process of creating ‘new processes’ as opposed to ‘new works’, because in this way one is always cultivating (new) knowledge by alternating the style, the medium, the process and perhaps also the discipline."

 

 

 

Artist Writing/Review, London

Review: New Paintings: Jonathan Parsons by Judith Duquemin

http://www.saturationpoint.org.uk/reviews.html